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Toxics Use Reduction Case Studies



Hampden Papers, Inc. 1998.

  Hampden Papers, Inc. reduced emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) by 97% by using new aqueous-based acrylics and other coating systems developed by a Massachusetts coatings manufacturer. The reduction of VOC has resulted in lower compliance costs, savings on insurance premiums, and a safer work environment. The avoidance of expenditures on VOC controls has helped Hampden to afford investments in high-quality production equipment. Download PDF file (21.75 kB)

Demonstration of Printwise: a "near-zero" lithographic ink and blanket wash system. 1997.

  TURI Technical Report No. 39. This report presents the results of a demonstration of the Printwise lithographic ink and water-based presswash printing system, designed to reduce emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) to near-zero levels. The Printwise system employs vegetable oil-based ink containing a "solubility conversion mechanism" that reacts with the presswash to become water-soluble. Its use could allow printers to reduce or eliminate their major source of VOC emissions: conventional petroleum-based presswash. Download PDF file (5.74 MB)

Acushnet Rubber Company. 1997.

  Located in New Bedford, Massachusetts, Acushnet was the first company in Massachusetts to obtain certification in ISO 14001, an international standard for environmental management. The company was also the first in the world to become certified in ISO 14001, ISO 9001 (a standard for quality programs), and the American automotive industry's QS-9000 quality standards. The company was able to move quickly to achieve ISO 14001 certification by taking advantage of the work previously done in completing a toxics use reduction (TUR) plan. Download PDF file (30.98 kB)

Electron Beam Curing of Polymers in Coating Processes, Metallized Products Inc. 1996.

  TURI Technical Report No. 34. Metallized Products, Inc. (MPI) chose Electron Beam (EB) curing over more traditional coating/curing methods, a choice which has allowed them to develop new, unique products and to have a lower impact on the environment than if they had chosen a solvent-based system. The coatings used in EB curing are solvent free and do not require thermal drying, allowing the process to run at very high speeds. EB curing also allows MPI to avoid the regulatory reporting and permitting requirements associated with solvent- and aqueous-based coating processes. Though capital costs of these systems are high, the production time, space, and energy requirements are low, making EB an economically attractive coating method. Download PDF file (200.40 kB)

Parker Hannifin Corporation, Nichols Aircraft Division. 1995.

  By purchasing aqueous deaning equipment based on cleaning needs at various stages of their process, Parker Hannifin was able to replace two vapor degreasers with five remote cleaning stations with a total project payback period of approximately one year. Download PDF file (598.14 kB)

Surface Cleaning Laboratory Case Study #3: A.W. Chesterton Company, Inc., Groveland, MA. 1995.

  Agitated aqueous cleaning combined with manual scrubbing proved successful for cleaning stainless steel and cast iron parts contaminated with epoxy resinsand curing agents. Tests were performed to determine an acceptable replacement for a methanol, xylene and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) cleaning operation. Potential operator exposure to solvents will be eliminated and waste disposal problems reduced when the hazardous solvents are substituted with an aqueous cleaning process. The company estimates a significant cost savings over solvent cleaning. Download PDF file (95.57 kB)

Surface Cleaning Laboratory Case Study #2: Wyman-Gordon Company, Inc., North Grafton MA. 1995.

  Aqueous ultrasonic cleaning of ionizing aluminum exhaust scrubber plates was successfully implemented at the Wyman-Gordon Company replacing a potassium hydroxide and glycol ether soaking operation. The company performs metal-working of ferrous and nonferrous alloys producing high strength alloy forgings for the aerospace and other industries.An in-depth investigation at the Surface Cleaning Laboratory of the Toxics Use Reduction Institute was conducted to assess the proper chemistries for removing airborne contaminants from the aluminum plates. Download PDF file (114.84 kB)

Surface Cleaning Laboratory Case Study #1: Market Forge, Everett MA. 1995.

  The project consists of technical, total cost, and substitution analyses of alternatives to chlorinated solvents for vapor degreasing. The technical analysis of alkaline aqueous degreasing was performed in TURI's Surface Cleaning Lab. Located in Everett, MA, Market Forge manufactures cooking steamers. Download PDF file (100.66 kB)

Cranston Print Works. 1995.

  Spurred by a desire to meet the goals of the Massachusetts Toxics Use Reduction Act, the managers of Cranston Print Works altered their wastewater pH adjustment process to eliminate the use of sulfuric acid. The company installed a jet aeration system with injected liquid carbon dioxide to replace the two 4,300-gallon sumps in which wastewater neutralization had previously taken place. This $115,000 project eliminated the annual use of 2.66 million pounds of sulfuric acid. Although financial profit was not the main goal of the project, the company saved about $80,000 per year in chemical purchase and maintenance costs. Download PDF file (23.29 kB)

Closed Loop Aqueous Cleaning. 1995.

  TURI Technical Report No. 29. This report serves as an introductory guide to closed loop aqueous cleaning for metal parts and electronics components. It includes three short case studies from the metal finishing and manufacturing sectors. Download PDF file (779.94 kB)

Cranston Print Works. 1995.

  Print Works altered their wastewater pH adjustment process to eliminate the use of sulfuric acid. The company installed a jet aeration system with injected liquid carbon dioxide to replace the two 4,300-gallon sumps in which wastewater neutralization had previously taken place. This $115,000 project eliminated the annual use of 2.66 million pounds of sulfuric acid. Although financial profit was not the main goal of the project, the company saved about $80,000 per year in chemical purchase and maintenance costs. Download PDF file (23.29 kB)

Substitution Case Study: Alternatives to Solvent-based Paints. 1993.

  TURI Technical Report No. 4. A Massachusetts producer of specialized metal tool cabinets has successfully switched from solvent-based to water-based paints in their coating operations. The painting process involves coating the metal drawers with a primer coat, and then spray painting the cabinets and drawer fronts with the color coat. Originally the components were spray-painted with solvent-based (xylene) paints for both the primer and color coats. In August 1981, the company switched over to a water-based first coat for the metal drawers, which is applied by electrodeposition in a fully automated process line. After the paint is applied, the drawer is low temperature baked at 25Q-2750f' and conveyed to the spray booths for color coating. Although the reasons for implementing the electrodeposition tank were based on the fact that the process provided a better finish and increased production capacity, use of the electrodeposition tank also eliminated the waste produced from the spray paint application of the primer coat. The entire cost for the electrodeposition system was about $500,000 and included purchase and installation of the baking oven, the 2500 gallon tank and the control system. Download PDF file (1.26 MB)

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